Guest Blog:
Shared Space For Toddler And Sibling - Setting Up A Room For Your Toddler And Big Kid To Share

by Guest Blogger

Room sharing tips can be super helpful for second-time mothers. Sibling room sharing can be a big success, even with a toddler and a big kid. Let’s look at some ways to ensure that there will be harmony in your home.

Practical Considerations

There are some practicalities you will need to consider when setting up a room for your toddler and big kid to share. 

siblings

Wait Until The Toddler Is Sleeping Soundly

It is best to wait until your toddler is sleeping consistently if you want your children to share a room. If your toddler is waking up in the night and disturbing their older sibling it is likely to cause a lot of friction and a very tired child. You also do not want to be waking up several times in the night and going to another room.

Change The Bedtime Routine Of Your Older Child

kid sleeping

It is likely that your toddler will be going to bed earlier. This means that you can simply carry out the bedtime routine of your big kid in your own room. This way you can read stories, sing gently and snuggle without disturbing the toddler.

Make The Room Toddler Friendly

For your younger child to get used to the room maybe they need a nightlight or a wave noise machine. Perhaps they need silence and darkness. Perhaps they would benefit from a Mitsubishi Ductless AC so they can keep cool in the summer.

Make It Fun

Talk to your older child about how sharing a room can be fun. Let them know that they get to update the decor and customize the room. You could make it into a game when they need to go to bed without waking the toddler (ninja stealth!).

Use A Bumper

If the toddler is still sleeping in a crib, using a bumper can help to create a bit of privacy. It can also block out light from the door opening at night, which means they are likely to sleep better.

Set Some Rules

You need to make it clear to your older child that they cannot climb on a crib. They shouldn’t be putting any objects into the crib. If your toddler is a light sleeper you also need to make sure your older child knows to be quiet.

Allow For An Adjustment Period

two kids sitting together

Remember that both of your children are making a big adjustment. If they seem to be struggling with the change, just give them time. Your family will find its rhythm and soon everybody will be sleeping well and getting along fine.

Designing A Shared Room

If children are of a similar age, designing a shared room should be easy. When there is an age gap, their needs are going to be very different.

Put The Toddler Closest To The Door

One of the biggest challenges of a toddler sharing a room with a bigger kid is making sure everybody gets enough sleep. If you make sure the toddler is closest to the door, you can get to them quicker if they are upset or crying.

Make Room For Different Sized Mattresses

Whether your toddler is still using a crib, or has transitioned to a small mattress, you can make your bigger kid feel special by giving them a much bigger bed. This way they might feel better about having a younger roommate.

Store Toys At Different Levels

child playing with blocks

This may seem obvious, but having storage space that is high up, out of the reach of your toddler, will keep your older child’s toys safe. This special access will help your older child to feel special as only they can get to these toys.

Break Up Space

You can find creative ways to break up space in the room. You could position a desk, a dresser or a bookshelf in between beds. This is an easy and efficient way to create some privacy and boundaries in a shared room.

Use An L-Shaped Layout

Being strategic in the way you place furniture can make the room feel much bigger. Lining beds up against walls can create a big open space in the middle of the room for your toddler and your big kid to play.

Less Is More

kid and baby shared bedroom

You may feel like you want to obsess over every little detail of the room design. When it comes to kids, leaving a lot of spare room can be the best bet. You can use creative storage solutions such as shelves, totes and toy chests. Consider only buying furniture that is totally necessary.

Try A Canopy For Privacy

If your older child feels they need more privacy, consider draping a canopy over their bed. This can create the feeling of a totally separate space. It can also look very stylish and elegant.

Use A Headboard With Storage

You may be short on space and looking for good solutions. A headboard with storage can allow your older child to display some of their favorite toys and items and keep them off the floor and out of harm's way.

Bunk Beds With Curtains

bunk beds

If your toddler has transitioned out of a crib, you can consider bunk beds with curtains. These are perfect for adding privacy and being able to block out the rest of the room. They can also add an element of fun. When your toddler gets older they can tell spooky stories and build forts.

Allow Individuality

To make your older child feel better about sharing a room, consider letting them make design choices and be expressive. You could let them choose the color of the walls, posters they like, duvet covers and even furniture.

In Summary

In this article we outline some tips for setting up a room for your toddler and big kid to share. There are some practical things to consider. This includes setting out some rules and allowing for an adjustment period. Make sure the room is toddler friendly and try to make it fun.

In terms of room design there are many ways you can make a wonderful shared space. Try using furniture to break up the space, having an L-shape layout or having less furniture. Try a canopy or bunk beds with curtains to create more privacy.

About The Author:

 

Guest Blogger David Sheppard

I’m David, a HVAC enthusiast and the founder of hvacjudge.com. My mission is to provide you with easy to understand HVAC knowledge in order for you to make the right HVAC choice for your home and family.


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